Free and Proper Elections

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Free and Proper Elections - NCFPE Poltical Blog and News Tracker

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  • James says:

    Andrew Jackson (March 15, 1767 – June 8, 1845) was the seventh President of the United States (1829–1837). He was military governor of Florida (1821), commander of the American forces at the Battle of New Orleans (1815), and eponym of the era of Jacksonian democracy. He was a polarizing figure who dominated American politics in the 1820s and 1830s. His political ambition combined with widening political participation by more people shaped the modern Democratic Party. Renowned for his toughness, he was nicknamed “Old Hickory”. As he based his career in developing Tennessee, Jackson was the first President primarily associated with the frontier. Andrew Jackson was born to Presbyterian Scots-Irish immigrants Andrew and Elizabeth Jackson, on March 15, 1767 approximately two years after they had emigrated from Carrickfergus. Three weeks after his father’s death, Andrew was born in the Waxhaws area near the border between North and South Carolina. He was the youngest of the Jackson ‘s three sons. His exact birth site was the subject of conflicting lore in the area. Jackson claimed to have been born in a cabin just inside South Carolina. He received a sporadic education in the local “old-field” school. During the American Revolutionary War, Jackson, at age thirteen, joined a local regiment as a courier. Andrew and his brother Robert Jackson were captured by the British and held as prisoners of war; they nearly starved to death in captivity. When Andrew refused to clean the boots of a British officer, the irate redcoat slashed at him with a sword, giving him scars on his left hand and head, as well as an intense hatred for the British. While imprisoned, the brothers contracted smallpox. Robert died a few days after their mother secured their release. Jackson’s entire immediate family died from war-related hardships which Jackson blamed on the British, and he was orphaned by age 14. Jackson was the last U.S. President to have been a veteran of the American Revolution, and the second President to have been a prisoner of war (Washington was captured by the French in the French and Indian War). Besides his legal and political career, Jackson prospered as a planter and merchant. In 1803 he owned a lot, and built a home and the first general store in Gallatin. In 1804, he acquired the “Hermitage”, a 640-acre (2.6 km2) plantation in Sumner County, near Nashville. Jackson later added 360 acres (1.5 km2) to the farm. The primary crop was cotton, grown by enslaved workers. Jackson started with nine slaves, by 1820 he held as many as 44, and later held up to 150 slaves. During the War of 1812, Tecumseh incited the “Red Stick” Creek Indians of northern Alabama and Georgia to attack white settlements. Four hundred settlers were killed in the Fort Mims Massacre. In the resulting Creek War, Jackson commanded the American forces, which included Tennessee militia, U.S. regulars, and Cherokee, Choctaw, and Southern Creek Indians. Jackson defeated the Red Stick Creeks at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend in 1814. Eight hundred “Red Sticks” were killed, but Jackson spared chief William Weatherford. Sam Houston and David Crockett served under Jackson in this campaign. After the victory, Jackson imposed the Treaty of Fort Jackson upon both the Northern Creek enemies and the Southern Creek allies, wresting twenty million acres (81,000 km²) from all Creeks for white settlement. Jackson was appointed Major General after this action. Jackson’s service in the War of 1812 against the United Kingdom was conspicuous for bravery and success. When British forces threatened New Orleans, Jackson took command of the defenses, including militia from several western states and territories. He was a strict officer but was popular with his troops. It was said he was “tough as old hickory” wood on the battlefield, which gave him his nickname. In the Battle of New Orleans on January 8, 1815, Jackson’s 5,000 soldiers won a victory over 7,500 British. The British had more than 2,000 casualties to Jackson’s 13 killed and 58 wounded or missing. The war, and especially this victory, made Jackson a national hero. He received the Thanks of Congress and a gold medal by resolution of February 27, 1815. Jackson served in the military again during the First Seminole War. He was ordered by President James Monroe in December 1817 to lead a campaign in Georgia against the Seminole and Creek Indians. Jackson was also charged with preventing Spanish Florida from becoming a refuge for runaway slaves. Critics later alleged that Jackson exceeded orders in his Florida actions. His directions were to “terminate the conflict.” Jackson believed the best way to do this would be to seize Florida. Before going, Jackson wrote to Monroe, “Let it be signified to me through any channel… that the possession of the Floridas would be desirable to the United States, and in sixty days it will be accomplished.” Monroe gave Jackson orders that were purposely ambiguous, suf

    August 26, 2013 at 1:04 am
  • te622993 says:

    a lot. there’s a lot to know. a fantastic book that you may start with is David McCullough’s John Adams. Its about the 2nd pres.

    August 26, 2013 at 4:15 am

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